Tying Demo – Chris Krueger – 11-12-16

This Week Featured Demo Tyer – Chris Krueger

Chris Krueger

Chris Krueger

 

Chris is an award winning musical director and educator who happens to also be a commercial fly tyer as well as a demonstration tyer for the Bass Pro Shops, International Sportsmen Exhibition, Denver Fly Fishing Show, West Denver TU tying Clinic, Fly Fishing Rendezvous, St. Vrain TU and Rocky Mountain Flycaster Tying Clinics. 

His company,  Rocky Mountain Fly Designs feature his creative genius with many of the patterns designed for the waters of our region. From micro to humongous patterns he can tie them all.

This week Chris will by tying some of his favorite flies.  Come ready to see anything from tiny to long and mean!

Click here for a downloadable recipe sheet.

Elkhorn Flyshop presents a fly tying demonstration  each Saturday at 10AM, from September through at least April, featuring some of the most talented and notable tyers in Northern Colorado.  It’s free!  Join us for fresh coffee, a donut or cookie, and some amazing demonstration tying.

 

Tying Demo – Connor Murphy – 11/5/16

 

 This Week Featured Demo Tyer – Connor Murphy

“Freshwater and Saltwater”

 

 Conor started young.  He’s still young, but by now has been all over the tying demo circuit, has had his flies featured in magazines, and is certain to continue adding to his reputation. Unsurprisingly, he is now turning his passion into a career, studying fish and wildlife biology at CSU. 

Although he’s matured a bit (and looks like the college kid he is),  the only pictures I have of him are from past tying demonstrations when he was younger – check out the frivolous introduction from the 2014 Connor Murphy Demo to see some images from his past, and my teasing.

 

By now, he’s had opportunities to chase big fish in lots of arenas, for lots of species, freshwater and saltwater.  This Saturday he’s tying some of his favorites from each.  His techniques and creativity will certainly enhance your tying enjoyment.

 


Elkhorn Flyshop presents a fly tying demonstration  each Saturday at 10AM, from September through at least April, featuring some of the most talented and notable tyers in Northern Colorado.  It’s free!  Join us for fresh coffee, a donut or cookie, and some amazing demonstration tying.

 

 

 

Elkhorn Saturday Tying Demo – 10-29-16

double-header

Saturday Double Header!

This Week’s Featured Tyer – Michael Ringus “Catskill Flies” at 10AM

followed by

Casey Prather  – Rocky Mountain Angling Club  12:30 PM

 

 

catskill-fly

Typical Catskill Fly

Michael Ringus enjoys tying and fishing classic patterns, and this Saturday he will be demonstrating “Catskill Flies”.   These patterns were developed in the upper New York Catskills, and are the foundation of our tying craft. 

Join us this Saturday for a re-introduction to the past!  These are beautiful flies, rewarding to tie, and you will likely want to try fishing a few of them!

You may recall last April when Michael’s program was “MOM flies” (Mary Orvis Marbury).

Here’s a link to  Michael’s demo recipes

 

Shortly after Michael’s tying demo, we are pleased to present a brief program by Casey Prather, introducing us to the Rocky Mountain Angling Club,  an association which provides its members with access to quality flyfishing on private waters around the state. 

Rocky Mountain Angling Club

Elkhorn Flyshop presents a fly tying demonstration  each Saturday at 10AM, from September through at least April, featuring some of the most talented and notable tyers in Northern Colorado.  It’s free!  Join us for fresh coffee, a donut or cookie, and some amazing demonstration tying.

Flycasting in Saltwater class

Diana Bonefish 0030“Fish, 2 O’Clock, 200 feet!.  Now what do you do?

Prepare yourself for that destination trip to the Bahamas or Florida or any other saltwater trip with this class focused on flycasting.  Learn  how to deal with challenges unique to the salt, such as estimating distance, communicating with a guide, getting your line ready, and delivering your fly the right distance, on target, and ready to go!

 

FLYCASTING CLASS – SALTWATER FLYCASTING

Instruction by:  Jim Tilmant, FFF Certified Casting Instructor

Prepare to get the most out of your saltwater destination!  This 2 hour class will help introduce you to special skills and techniques to enhance your saltwater flyfishing.  How to manage your line so you are ready when a fish is sighted, how to locate fish when the guide says “Two O’Clock, 100 feet!”, and how to get your fly on target without delay.   (This class will be on grass and will not involve time on the water)

Skill Level:  Intermediate level casters capable of false casting and shooting moderate amounts of line.

Class Size:       Limited to 6 Students

Cost:                $35.00 / person

 

Casting Class with Jim Tilmant - Saltwater Casting

Saltwater casting class
  • Price: $50.00
    Everything saltwater - lines, communication with guides, wind, and presentation.

Elkhorn Saturday Tying Demo – 10-22-16

Featured Tyer – Steve “Drunk and Disorderly” Rogers

Gonga by Steve Rogers

      Gonga by Steve

Come by Saturday to our Tying Demo to see if that description is Steve’s alias, or just a nickname.

This Saturday, his theme will be “Tying Meat”, and since he is incapable of keeping a secret, this will be a fantastic opportunity to interrogate him on where, when and how to fish big streamers.

If you attended last year’s demo by Steve,  or if you have been to a Vise Squad! event, you know that Steve and his henchmen Jon, Chuck and Keegan are the ones covered in marabou and rabbit by night’s end after another big streamer session.

Steve is always looking for hot new designs, and not just streamers – he is our source for some deadly caddis dries and sowbug imitations. 

 

 Join us Saturday, and make sure to let me introduce you to Elkhorn’s new owners Jim and Dan McGann.  (Dan’s fishing log covers an incredible array of Colorado waters.  He doesn’t know it yet, but he’s due for our Elkhorn Arm Twist to see if he’s any better at keeping secrets than Steve!)

Here’s a link to  Steve Rogers Recipes for 10-22-16


Elkhorn Flyshop presents a fly tying demonstration  each Saturday at 10AM, from September through at least April, featuring some of the most talented and notable tyers in Northern Colorado.  It’s free!  Join us for fresh coffee, a donut or cookie, and some amazing demonstration tying. 

 

 

 

Introduction to Fly Tying

Vise Squad! Peak Vise

Peak Vise

Fly-tying season is upon us! 

We are starting our fall schedule with our Introduction to Fly Tying class.  It’s perfect for beginners, even those who have never before seen a fly tied!  You will learn how to use the vise, tools and equipment, then dive right in and tie a fly!   You will leave knowing how to start your thread, bind and wrap materials to the hook, and tie a finishing knot with the mysterious “Whip Knot” tool.   You will leave the class with several useful flies you have tied, and enough hooks and materials to tie a few more at home.

SydneyThis is a perfect foundation for taking the “Fundamentals of Fly Tying” class.  

You don’t need to bring anything – All tools, equipment, hooks and materials are provided.  The location for all sessions is Elkhorn Fly Shop.

Two dates available!  Get in on one of them and you’ll be ready for the wonderful slate of tying classes and clinics starting in November!

 

 

    Fee:                     $25
    Class size:             3-6
    Sessions:              One session, 2 hrs

    Primary Instructor:  Marty Staab

Elkhorn Saturday Fly Tying Demo 10-14-16

This Week’s Featured Tyer – Richard Pilatzke

 

PILATZKE PHOTO

Richard Pilatzke

Rich has spent the last three years as the demonstration fly tying program director for the Denver International Sportsmen Exhibition.  An all-around fly tier and well known demonstration fly tier who tied at the Denver Fly Fishing Show, West Denver TU tying clinic as well as many of the fly shops along the Front Range.  Perhaps known more recently for his fly patterns tied out of foam, he will bring many of his latest creations for his demonstration.  He is a stillwater specialist and has fished many of the stillwater for trout and warm water species along the Front Range.  His patterns have appeared in “Modern Midge”, “ Modern Terrestrials” and in Pat Dorsey’s newest book  “Colorado Guide Flies”.

Elkhorn Saturday Tying Demo – 10-8-16

Featured Tyer – Dennis Martin

"<yoastmarkMARTIN 01.15.18

 

DENNIS MARTIN “Effective Trout and Warm Water Patterns” 

Dennis has been a fixture on the Front Range Fly Tying scene, known for his deer hair tying and other warmwater expertise.   You may have seen him our regional tying expositions, such as the Denver Fly Fishing Show, West Denver TU Tying Clinic, and our local TU expos by the Saint Vrain chapter and the Rocky Mountain Flycasters.  He applies his experience fishing bass tournaments to his fly designs, and Saturday will be a great time to grill him on “How to Fish It” as well as “How to Tie It”. 

Flycasting Class – the Double Haul

FLYCASTING CLASS – LEARNING THE DOUBLE HAUL

AND OTHER TECHNIQUES FOR INCREASING DISTANCE

DATE:  Saturday, October 8, 2016   1PM

WHERE:  Elkhorn Fly Shop   

Instruction by Jim Tilmant,  FFF Certified Casting Instructor

This 2 hour class will help deal with wind and cast longer distances with the double-haul, and teach you the adjustments that must be made in your casting stroke to handle the increased line speeds.  Instruction will be tailored to the ability level of students within the class.  (This class will be on grass and will not involve time on the water)

Skill Level:  Intermediate level casters capable of false casting and shooting moderate amounts of line.

Class Size:       Limited to 5 Students

Cost:                $35.00 / person

 


Casting Class with Jim Tilmant - Saltwater Casting

Saltwater casting class
  • Price: $50.00
    Everything saltwater - lines, communication with guides, wind, and presentation.

Fly Rod Selection

Choosing A Fly Rod (single handed, not Tenkara or Spay)

Choosing a new fly rod is easy if you know your exact needs and constraints. If not, you must lean toward a compromise general purpose rod. Look at five considerations that you should at least understand before saying, “I want that one.” In the end, I will give you my suggestion for that general purpose Colorado fly fishing rod.

  1. Predominate fishing:

Consider the classic fly shop question, “What will you be fishing for, or how?” It’s really the key question. Small streams mean smaller fish, smaller flies, and shorter accurate casts (2, 3, and 4 wt rods). Larger water including lakes get into larger fish and longer casts (5 and 6 wt rods). Then there is fishing for big fish with big flies (7 and 8 wt rods). Drift boat fishing benefits from the 5 and 6 wts because of the extra weight and strike indicators on the line, and the heavy large flies of streamer fishing suggest the 6 and 7 wt rods. Overall, a 5 wt is a good compromise. It’s overkill for the brook trout, and you will loose some of the bass that you can’t pull out of the weeds, but more than 80% of the time you are good to go.

  1. Rod technology: cane (bamboo), fiberglass, graphite

The second consideration is rod technology. Carbon graphite is today’s rod-chartcommon choice, but your dad fished fiberglass, and granddad fished cane or bamboo. All are available today. Fiberglass is re-growing in popularity, and cane rods have always lurked in the background. The chart below shows how my 5 wt graphite, fiberglass and cane rods deflect from horizontal with the same weight suspended from the tip.

The graphite rod is a medium action, not fast. The fiberglass and bamboo are slow. As the slow rods bend further under the same weight, it will take longer to complete the cast. In casting terms, bending is loading the rod, and the caster must slow down to load the slower rod.

The slower rod allows more time to control the cast, thus we hear slow rods make more accurate and delicate presentations. At the same time the line is exposed to the wind longer, and we hear fast rods handle the wind better. Increasing the pull on the rod tip by casting bigger and heaver flies, increases the bend of the rod. At some point the rod bends too much to control the line and achieve the cast. It is overloaded. The faster rod can manage more weight before overloading. It is better for long casts because there is more line weight in the air, and it’s faster line speed means less time exposed to air resistance.

It is the person, not the rod that performs, and in the hands of an expert all three rods are capable of delicate and/or long presentations. We are not all experts, but we can match our rod selection to our predominate fishing conditions and expertise. And we can enjoy, if not fully utilize the more relaxed dry fly presentation of a slower rod, or the intense heavy fly and wind defying capability of the fast rod.

  1. Number of sections and rod length

Third, consider transporting and storing the rod. Four piece rods are the most common, but five and seven piece rods are available – think backpacking. Two piece are more traditional, but the rod case will be over four feet long. Today all of these configurations cast equally well. Nine feet has become a standard, but shorter is less troublesome among the trees.

  1. Price range

I will mention price range as the fourth consideration, but your budget will peg its priority. Faster light weight rods require more costly materials, and are more expensive. Rod component technology and quality, guides, cork, and reel seats, can drive up cost. Labor always increases cost. Fancy guide wraps and beautiful finishs are expensive. All of these factors, particularly labor drive the cost of custom made rods. Cane rods are very labor intensive, and cost up to $3000. But, and this is big, the fish only sees the fly in the water, and doesn’t know what rod you used to get it there.

  1. Feel in hand, including grip

traveler-tip-deflectHow the rod performs and feels in your hand is the fifth consideration. It’s tough if you are a beginner. You won’t know what good feels like, and performance will be function of your inexperienced hand, not the rod. Here is where you want to deal with a credible fly shop representative that you trust. But, lets first understand the characteristics and terminology of fly rods.

Look at the tip deflection of three different Elkhorn 9 foot Traveler rods when a 140 gr weight is suspended from the tip. 140 grains is the weight of the first thirty feet of a 5wt line. It flexes the 5 wt rod tip 5 and ¼ inches. The same weight flexes the 4 wt rod more and the 6 wt rod less, as we should expect. Remember the discussion about under-lining and over-lining in the previous article about line selection. The point is, you can modify the performance and feel of your rod with line selection. A heavier line will bend the rod more and make it feel slower and a lighter line will make it feel faster.

Line makers know that rods are becoming faster and faster. They make lines that are a half or even a full weight heavy so that the rod feels slower and is easier for the non-expert to cast.5-wt-deflect

Finally, lets look at three different model Elkhorn rods, all 9 foot 5 wt rods. The differences are subtle, but significant in your hand. The Namaqua is closest to a progressive taper, a rod with a uniform taper from butt to tip, and a constantly increasing deflection. It will have a more relaxed traditional feel.

The Traveler bends more out to six feet, and then the tip deflects less, a “faster tip.” It has a sense of being slower, but then the fast tip will drive the line forward in the cast. You might say it feels slower, but performs faster.

The Amp rod bends the least in the butt, “fast butt” and has a slower tip. It will easily transfer the force of your cast to the tip, and the slower tip will give a feel of line control.

Recommendation – The All Purpose Colorado Fly Rod

Now, my simple recommendation for the general purpose Colorado fly rod, particularly for the beginner. A 5 weight will meet the broadest need, and 9 foot is standard. Graphite is the practical choice, and four pieces offer the widest selection. Stay between $200 and $400, and under $200 if you are just trying fly fishing. Choose a “medium action” rod. If you are shopping at Elkhorn, try a Traveler 9 foot 5 weight. Then see if a Namaqua or Amp feels better in your hand.